Tagged: drawings

Recent things..

Troy Town in-progressLast month I spent two weeks at Troy Town Art Pottery working on some new ceramic pieces as a collaboration with Ben Cove. Updates to follow when they have been taken out of the kiln (if they all survive..)

I was really pleased to show a drawing from my Body/Building series and some artists’ books with Day & Gluckman at Sluice Art Fair. The rest of the ‘Body/Building’ series are currently on display as part of Fabric Spaces as PIANOFABRIEK in Brussels, curated by Sevie Tsampalla.

I’ll be going quiet for a while to get into the studio, do some writing and to finish off a few new editions. I will be back on 5th February next year with a wearable sculpture work for an event at the Wellcome Collection.

 

Strange Business & Cities of Ash

I’m very pleased to be in great company in two exhibitions at the moment, ‘Strange Business’ at SYSON, Nottingham and ‘Cities of Ash’ at g39, Cardiff.


Apricot Stairs


STRANGE BUSINESS

New Watercolour Painting

Gordon Dalton, Lois Gardner Sabet, Anneliese Krueger, Yelena Popova, Oliver Raymond-Barker, Beth Shapeero, Emily Speed, Oliver Tirre

24 July – 19 September 2014

STRANGE BUSINESS is a group exhibition of new watercolour painting presented by SYSON in Nottingham. This exhibition features works using a traditional yet versatile type of painting, which is often overlooked or perceived as old fashioned. Watercolours in this exhibition comprise studies of opacity and transparency, and explore colour saturation, site specificity, found objects and sculptural forms. Often drawing upon highly personal subjects and areas of interest, works featured include preparatory studies, explorations of natural materials, installations and film and video – attempting to explore what JMW Turner recognised the activity of painting to be; ‘a strange business’, and artists undertake the task of painting with water and colour in the broadest sense.

CITIES OF ASH

Rob Voerman, Colin Booth, Emily Speed, Hannah Waldron, Isabelle Hayeur, James Moore, Robin Tarbet

12 July – 13 September

Flexing the architectural imagination, the artists in Cities of Ash offer the god-like experience of model city panoramas found in civic museums or on observation decks of towering skyscrapers. They each engage in the pursuit of obscuring the urban experience with a fantasy veil, leaving glimpses between its brushstrokes.

 

January exhibitions

The Land Has Many Parts
January 15 – February 15 . 2014
Jane Deering Gallery, Santa Barbara, CA

Silence Unbound: The Artist’s Lexicon in the Making
January 17, 2014 – March 29, 2014
Center for Book Arts New York
Organized by Heather Powell

The artists featured in Silence Unbound often work in familiar forms, but have at some point been driven to create or conceive of an object that incorporates their language into a book-like design. The juxtaposition of the book next to an artwork- painting, print, photograph, or performance ephemera- is meant to delineate a space that considers the translation of the artist’s aesthetic vocabulary into writing systems. Featured Artists include: Dean Ebben, David Hammons, Candace Hicks, Christopher K. Ho, Jenny Holzer, Alison Knowles, Jessica Lagunas, Matthew C. Lange, Dani Leventhal, Barbara Rosenthal, Buzz Spector, Emily Speed, and Kristen Tordella-Williams.

Topophobia

Last few days in the studio on the work for the Topophobia exhibition, opening at Danielle Arnaud on 13th January. ‘Star Fort’ will be a fold up structure built and documented in the gallery (some preliminary sketches for the work shown). The second leg of the show, at the Bluecoat from 2nd March, will also feature a newly commissioned work that will occupy the corridor space.

The fear of place and the manifestation of this in contemporary art is the territory for TOPOPHOBIA. As an anxiety disorder, this phobia is understood as an irrational dread of certain places or situations, yet, considered as a cultural phenomenon topophobia connects us to the existential human question of how each of us finds our place in the world. The exhibition and related publication take a look at the representation of place and space as threatened or threatening.

TOPOPHOBIA is a group show featuring the work of ten UK and international artists. The range of media and approaches is wide. Anne Eggebert makes detailed drawings derived from images on Google Earth; Matthias Einhoff uses high-end corporate video techniques to make a spectacle of an urban wasteland; David Ferrando Giraut creates a state of anxiety with his filmic pan of the aftermath of a car accident; Polly Gould constructs distorted topographical watercolours reflected in the surface of a globe; Marja Helander depicts herself out of place between her two cultures of contemporary Finland and Sami nomadic heritage; Uta Kogelsberger reveals uncanny night visions of urban and desert America in her photographs; Almut Rink appropriates the 3D software used by architects to take the viewer on an imaginary journey in a virtual space; Abigail Reynolds exposes disjointed time and place in her use of old book illustrations in collages and assemblage. Emily Speed houses her body in a fortress made from shutters; and Louise K Wilson uses sound derived from her work at a previously top secret Cold War testing site.

The Emely Cafe and Reading on wheels

Last week I finished working in Cambridge after building a pod structure on wheels. I had a great time getting on with some constructing and also chatting to artist Rosalie Schweiker, who is running the ‘Emely Cafe’ at Aid & Abet at the moment.

The ‘Reading Space’ that I made was especially for Kobo Abe’s book ‘The Box Man’. The idea is that the reader can get into this space, wheel it around until they find just the right spot and settle down to read. There is a cup holder for coffee too of course and a plush red seat. A hole in the floor allows the user to out one foot through and scoot themselves about flintstones-style.

Rosalie kindly filmed some short snippets of me road-testing the reading pod. Here I use it to steal cake.

Reading Space on The Emely’s vimeo channel

Artist Corinna Spencer has also taken some great photos of the exhibition – see them on Flikr here