Tagged: architecture

A Parade of Architectural Commas

I have been a tad lax on updates recently! A few exhibitions have gone up (and come down) in the meantime including

(Re)learning to Read, a group show curated by TORQUE at the Grundy Art Gallery, Blackpool
Transparency, an Arts Council collection show at Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool
[Re]construct at the Chapel at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

parade

as part of the last exhibition, YSP commissioned a new piece of work (well, strictly speaking two, as the film in the exhibition is also newly commissioned by them). Last weekend a group of performers took a walk around the ground as part of A Parade of Architectural Commas. It’s always strange testing out a new piece in such a public way and there was lots to think ab

 

out and changes to make for the next outing as part of their 40th birthday celebrations on July 16th. The title comes from Capability Brown’s writing on the construction of a garden landscape and refers to the follies that traditionally inhabit a Georgian Garden.

parade

Here there are five archetypes: the grotto, the chapel, the ruin, the obelisk and the pyramid. I have been thinking a lot about the tease and reveal of this kind of landscape, with it’s carefully crafted views, but I am realising that erotic sensibility is all but impossible when a comedic pair of legs are introduced to a sculptural costume. Perhaps a photo shoot with the follies (commas) in July will better reveal their seductive side… watch this space.parade

WSpace

WORK / SPACE

I’ve been working on a project with Oriel Wrecsam and students/staff from Glyndwr University to make a portable, multi-functional space inspired by the ad-hoc, flexible structures of market stalls. Finally, on Wednesday 25th November, it will be leaving the University and is getting trundled down to the gallery by a group of students…. come and join us/see the work if you can. Starting at the art school at 1pm.

A zine with contributions by a number of brilliant folk will also be launched at the move so thanks go out to Andrew Gannon, Paul Heppell, Dave Jones, Paul Jones, Steffan Jones-Hughes, Josie Moore, Hugh Sanders, Rosalie Schweiker and Jilliene Sellner for their contributions.

The official bit: Built by Emily Speed and Paul Heppell, WORK / SPACE was commissioned by Oriel Wrecsam and will travel around the town and in particular the People’s Market, changing function as it goes. The work will be open for proposals to be used to exhibit work, hold performances, readings, discussion groups and intimate screenings for an audience of one.

Made from furniture bought at the People’s Market, the work was made in response to the gallery’s Space and Place strand – thinking about location and site while the gallery moves site to a new space. Taking the ad-hoc, mobile and adaptable structures found in indoor and outdoor markets, the work is designed to be comprised of seating, display, storage and perhaps other uses yet to be added..  

WSpacewspaceseats
wspace1WORK / SPACE tumblr

 

Unbuilt Library

Next week I will have some small works, some that date as far back as 2005, leaving the studio for the first time to be exhibited at Mrs Rick’s Cupboard (thanks for the invitation Craig Fisher):

Fragment

P.V: 12 February 2015 (7 – 9pm)

13 February – 26 March 2015    Open Friday 12-4pm

Mrs Rick’s Cupboard is pleased to invite you to our next exhibition, ‘Unbuilt Library’ by Emily Speed.

Each model in the Unbuilt Library is a reading room designed for the reading of a specific book or text, with space for only one or very occasionally, two readers.  Speed is interested in the relationship between the body and architecture and the book/spaces featured in this library all make this connection and have been particularly influential on Speed’s practice; literature is often a significant part of her research. The shape, materials and size of these intimate spaces are chosen according to the text itself, taking cues from the events, characters and tone. The models (or perhaps, unrealised sculptures) have been made over a long period of time, the earliest in 2007 and the most recent in 2015. 

The architectural model itself is also of great interest to Speed as a medium that presents an ideal; existing as pure potential. Models are delicate, yet symbolic of power, because they can be held and even destroyed by human hands (the city, literally in your grasp) and they also provide an unusual situation, where one can be fully outside of a space and see the whole.

Mrs Rick’s Cupboard

33 Seely Road
Nottingham
NG7 1NU
United Kingdom

Strange Business & Cities of Ash

I’m very pleased to be in great company in two exhibitions at the moment, ‘Strange Business’ at SYSON, Nottingham and ‘Cities of Ash’ at g39, Cardiff.


Apricot Stairs


STRANGE BUSINESS

New Watercolour Painting

Gordon Dalton, Lois Gardner Sabet, Anneliese Krueger, Yelena Popova, Oliver Raymond-Barker, Beth Shapeero, Emily Speed, Oliver Tirre

24 July – 19 September 2014

STRANGE BUSINESS is a group exhibition of new watercolour painting presented by SYSON in Nottingham. This exhibition features works using a traditional yet versatile type of painting, which is often overlooked or perceived as old fashioned. Watercolours in this exhibition comprise studies of opacity and transparency, and explore colour saturation, site specificity, found objects and sculptural forms. Often drawing upon highly personal subjects and areas of interest, works featured include preparatory studies, explorations of natural materials, installations and film and video – attempting to explore what JMW Turner recognised the activity of painting to be; ‘a strange business’, and artists undertake the task of painting with water and colour in the broadest sense.

CITIES OF ASH

Rob Voerman, Colin Booth, Emily Speed, Hannah Waldron, Isabelle Hayeur, James Moore, Robin Tarbet

12 July – 13 September

Flexing the architectural imagination, the artists in Cities of Ash offer the god-like experience of model city panoramas found in civic museums or on observation decks of towering skyscrapers. They each engage in the pursuit of obscuring the urban experience with a fantasy veil, leaving glimpses between its brushstrokes.

 

Sexy films

I made this film. Essentially a valentine’s card, it’s short but has a sexy soundtrack and features the ultimate erotic architecture; several ‘crotch shots’ where walls and ceilings meet in the pavilions in the Giardini della Biennale in Venice.

sexy films

Architecture is the Ultimate Erotic Act, 2014 (2 mins 15 seconds), made especially for Sex Shop.

SEX SHOP is an artist-run distribution network for social products. Just like sex it brings together people from all walks of life. Just like a shop it distributes useful goods.
Valentine’s Day
14/02/2014
from 6pm
20 Parade Mews London SE27 9AX
@sexshopdistro

 

Available at Sex Shop for £2 from 14th February or for £3 by post. Email me if you’d like one.

 

Panoply

Some images of my new work, Panoply, at the Bluecoat as part of Topophobia. I’ll be inside the work next on Saturday from 12 – 2pm and will post a schedule of future performances here very soon..

All images courtesy of Anne Eggebert.

Panoply, 2012
Space for a body: scaffold and painted wood.
20ft x 3ft x 8ft

[A panoply is a complete suit of armour or a complete set of diverse components."panoply" refers to the full armour of a hoplite or heavy-armed soldier, i.e. the shield, breastplate, helmet and greaves, together with the sword and lance.] Source

Panoply is a kind of hiding place made high above the normal passageways of the gallery, shielding me from the other inhabitants, like armour for my body. Fractured glimpses of my body are visible as I move around the space. This narrow corridor is like a wooden cloak or carapace, but the privacy it affords also turns into a trap; a claustrophobic space I can’t leave without being seen.

Camp Out

Upcoming exhibition at Laumeier Sculpture Park:

Camp Out: Finding Home in an Unstable World

June 2 – September 16, 2012

Camp Out: Finding Home in an Unstable World is the third in a series of summer projects that will use the natural and cultural resources of St. Louis as a site for artistic inquiry and production. The artists invited for Camp Out will conduct “action research” to comment on, add to or question the unique history of the St. Louis region and of the role artist’s play in addressing urgent social questions. The title Camp Out suggests the two extremes of living in the landscape. For some, camping is a deliberate “back-to-nature” experience precluded in our urbanized world. For other past and present global citizens, however, displacement from home and finding basic resources for living is a great struggle.

Laumeier will animate its public spaces by presenting artists whose practice addresses long-neglected issues of concern in our region, such as the disappearance of “public space”, the conversion of arable agricultural land for suburban sprawl or industrial use, the isolation that comes with suburban living and the persistent social and economic divisions between racial groups caused through the mechanisms of history. Artists for this project will work off of ancient and contemporary forms of human shelter, using new materials and processes to create unique sculptural forms. The resulting works will encompass shapes deeply rooted in nature to those that use new technologies to engage the aural and visual landscapes that say something about the way we live—or need to live—now. These projects will unpack a range of American myths, from the self-sufficiency of the rugged individual to the sense of land as empty and conquerable, where resource extraction is without consequence. This project signals a refreshed direction for Laumeier’s artistic goals, and will allow artists a unique opportunity to experiment with space. 

Artists for the project include: BGL: Jasmin Bilodeau, Sébastien Giguère, and Nicolas Laverdière (Canada), Oliver Bishop-Young (UK), Cyprien Gaillard (France), Isabelle Hayeur (Canada), Edgar Martins (UK), Mary Mattingly (USA), Michael Rakowitz (USA), Emily Speed (UK), Dré Wapenaar (the Netherlands), Yin Xiuzhen (China), Kim Yasuda (USA).

Drawing Shed animation

Here it is finally; the resulting animation from the drawing I did at PSL in August. It clearly has issues, like some wobbles, focus and other things, but as a first attempt I am going to try and let those things go and just enjoy the destruction.

Drawing Shed week 5: Emily Speed

There are also some images of the project and collaborative drawing evening at PSL on their Drawing Shed blog

BUILT

I am in an exhibition at Rogue Project Space in Manchester, which opens this Thursday.built

Exhibition details:

BUILT
1st to 8th April 2010. Opening the 1st of April from 6-8pm

Kristy Campbell, Lisa Gorton, Catherine Pudner, Emily Speed, Anna Sikorska

BUILT brings together 5 Female artists from across the UK whose practises deal with specific aspects of the built environment. Through the use of Sculpture, Installation, Animation and Performance the selected artists respond to the structures which surround our daily activity; be that personal shelters and social networks, or our more public man made surroundings that are compounded in the cities we live in. They search for a space in the parameters between art and these constructed locations, subtly commenting; “Women build stuff too”.

Built is curated by Elizabeth Murphy.
Rogue Artists’ Studios & Project Space
66-72 Chapeltown St, Manchester, M1 2WH

If you’re on facebook, the event is here